Refashion: A New Life For A Wonky Dress

Three years ago I went to the lovely Cape Cod for a family wedding. It was 8C and rain when we landed in Boston and for take-off, one week later, it was 35C and sunny. Quite the contrast! (This is me in Cape Cod, BTW)

The wedding was held at the bride’s parents’ house in Chatham and it was a nice affair. We were served lobster, which I avoided due to an allergic reaction the previous year (according to my cousin (MD) lobster contain an allergen that do affect everybody, it’s just the cut-off limit that varies for different people) and danced the night away. Or, rather evening since the kids were only 4 and 7 at the time. I had made a dress for the occasion, a dress with which I struggled immensely. It was a nightmare to fit.

The before. With a safety pin in place. And a dried-out lawn.

I have worn the dress since, but always with a safety pin holding the neckline in place and having such a solution meant I never really felt comfortable in it. Plus the waistline was wonky and I always felt like such a fraud whenever I wore and got compliments. People got fooled by the pretty fabric that this dress looked good. So, I decided a refashion was in order.

The after, front. Everything lays nicely no and I can move without fear of indecent exposure.

I internally debated on whether or not I should make a skirt or a “new” dress. In the end I settled on a dress, since I had enough fabric leftover to make a new bodice*. I used the Belladone bodice from Deer & Doe; I added length and removed the back overlay bodice, extending the underlay bodice to match the front shoulders. This meant I could keep the back v-line, which I like having in dresses. Instead of using bias tape as facing I lined the bodice in a thin voile, with interfacing around the neckline, for comfort and structure.

The back. I like back v-necklines. And I did the zipper better this time. *Win*

Since the dress was finished right before midsummer it accompanied me to a small gathering with friends and it held up fine for all classical midsummer games and dances. I would not have done the “little frog dance” in the previous version, but with this dress I had no worries that my boobs would pop out.

So, refashion success!

 

*Bodice in Swedish translates to “liv”. As does life. So in Swedish when I say I gave my dress a new “liv” it means both bodice and life. I do appreciate a good word pun!

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